Artist profile: Sally Heinrich

Imagine a children’s book illustrator and you may as well picture Sally Heinrich. With a smile that lights up the room, she genuinely embodies the playfulness and creativity of the worlds she creates in picture books.

During her career, the Adelaide artist has illustrated more than forty books (which include some of her own picture books), non-fiction books, activity books and novels. A trained graphic designer, Sally has also worked for clients in advertising and environmental agencies, design studios and government departments. She’s designed several wine labels, created a mural for the Singapore Zoo and drawn one-off pieces for weddings and birthdays.

Sally Heinrich publicity shot
Sally at work in her studio.

Sally’s work has been recognised through fellowships from the Asialink Foundation, The May Gibbs Children’s Literature Trust, Varuna-the Writer’s Centre and Arts SA, and her original artwork and lino-prints have been exhibited in Australia and Asia.

She recently curated Gallery 1855’s Adelaide Fringe Festival exhibition for 2019, Décalage, a body of work showcasing South Australian children’s illustrators. While each work may be a scene from a children’s book, they each stand on their own as an individual piece, telling a story. Décalage shows just how much is involved in the creation of children’s pictures, as they must work with the words of the story, to the most honest audience of all: young children.

Sally has brought together 10 SA illustrators in this collection, including Donna Gynell, Mandy Foot, Linda Catchlove, David Kennett, Danny Snell, Jennifer Harrison, Timothy Ide, Amanda Graham and Georgina Chadderton.

The gorgeous Sally Heinrich
The gorgeous Sally Heinrich, in front of one of her artworks in Décalage

To find out more about how Sally put the works together, we asked her a few questions:

What is a Décalage?

Décalage is a French word used to express the way two things don’t fit together, like the shift in time between one country and another. In a picture book context it expresses the disparity of meaning between word and image. There are many ways this can happen. For example, the words might be saying one thing and the pictures showing another. It’s this space between word and picture that I find particularly exciting about picture books as a creative medium. The space that requires the reader to make connections and also allows room for the reader’s imagination. The sum – of the words and pictures – can be far greater than the parts.

Pussycat at the door - Danny Snell
Danny Snell, Pussycat at the door, 2018, mixed media, digital print. From Let’s Go Strolling. Written by Katrina Germain. Little Book Press.


How did this exhibition come about?

I was asked to curate an exhibition and a fellow illustrator, Donna Gynell, who is one of the participants, suggested the theme. It immediately resonated because it is the thing I find most exciting both as an illustrator and reader of picture books. I discussed it with other illustrators and they were all enthusiastic about the idea. I also saw it as an opportunity to give a glimpse of the world of illustration to a broader audience, who may either not be aware of picture books, and/or may be dismissive of them as a simple entertainment for young children. I believe that picture books are under appreciated by many, and that some of the finest and most exciting artwork being produced in the world can be found in picture books.

Evening armchair - David Kennett
David Kennett, Evening armchair, 2017, digital print with pencil. All illustrations from Armistice. Written by Ruth Starke. Working Title Press.


Where did your interest in art begin and how long have you been a practicing artist?

As long as I can remember I was making up stories and drawing. When I was in Kindergarten my sister was studying to become a teacher and she would often sit with me and annotate the drawings I did. It was fascinating to look back at some of them and see how much of a story was behind very simple images! After High School I studied Graphic Design at what is now Uni SA, and majored in illustration. I’ve been working as a freelance illustrator and writer ever since graduating. My work has encompassed advertising, publishing and increasingly workshops and community art projects.

Frog on can by Amanda Graham
Amanda Graham, Frog on a Can, 2006. Watercolour. From Bushranger Bill. Written by Megan de Kantzoe. Omnibus Books.


You say that illustrating picture books is a more complex undertaking than many people realise. Why is that?

Illustrating a book is far more than just creating a series of single images. They must connect and be consistent, while working within the boundaries of a set size and number of pages. The illustrations in a picture book – or at least in the best ones – are not simple reflecting what the words are saying. They are expanding on the text and enhancing it, and playing an integral part in the storytelling. I would say that as much as 90% of illustrating a book goes into the thinking and planning. That is not to take away from the other 10% which demands a high level of technical and drawing skills. For example, it is easy enough to draw a character once, but in a book you need to recreate that character over and over, showing different emotions, engaged in different activities and from different angles. This is just one of the challenges.  It demands a huge commitment of time and focus.

Reef by Jennifer Harrison
Jennifer Harrison, Rainbow Reef, 2018. Colour pencil. From Vanishing. Written by Mike Lucas. Midnight Sun Publishing.


There’s rather a lot of South Australian children’s illustrators. How hard is it to ‘get into’ the industry?

That’s a hard question and there’s probably not a definitive answer. Everyone has their own story. It certainly requires focus and commitment. The children’s writing and illustrating community though is extremely generous and supportive of people who are trying to get into the industry. There are professional organisations which are open to unpublished creators, workshops and courses and mentorships. I would say that it isn’t easy, but possible for anyone with passion and commitment. The monetary returns are not necessarily in any proportion to the amount of work often involved, so I believe that most of us who do it, do it because of that passion.

Oh Brother by Georgina Chadderton
Georgina Chadderton, Oh Brother, 2019, Digital print on archival paper. Forthcoming publication: Oh Brother: growing up with a brother with autism. Author: Georgina Chadderton.


You have lived in Darwin, Sydney, Singapore and Malaysia, and are now based in Adelaide. Have all of these places had an influence on your work?

Most definitely. The most obvious is the Asian content in much of my work. I think that you can’t help but be influenced by everything in your life whether you realise it or not!

Donna Gynell
Donna Gynell, Dancing with Ruby, 2017, hand assembled mixed media collage. Illustration on pages 4-5 of publication.


What are you working on next and what are you looking forward to?

Gosh – I’m working on two picture books, one is a companion to Papa Sky, which I hope to have finished by the middle of the year. I am also working on a graphic novel with Shamini Flint. In between I have a couple of printmaking projects, running some workshops in illustration and writing, and the occasional commercial job all necessary to keep food on the table while working on the books.

I’m looking forward to the second half of the year when I’m hoping to be able to commit my time to completing my own wordless picture book which has been waiting to be done for many, many years, and also completing a novel which likewise has been worked on, on and off, for many years.

Sally Heinrich

 

Decalage is Gallery 1855’s Adelaide Fringe Festival exhibition for 2019, on display from 6 Feb-16 March.

It will then be on display at Tea Tree Gully Library from 3 April – 2 June 2019.

For more information, visit Gallery 1855’s website

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Artist profile: Cathy Frawley

Artist Cathy Frawley’s recent exhibition, Abstract Fields, was a personal response to a range of landscapes, including urban landscapes, seascapes or natural landscapes. Optimistic and charged with colour, Cathy’s paintings provide a positive emotional effect, offering respite from the more challenging aspects of life.

Below Cathy expands on her work and practice:



What is your exhibition about and what inspired this body of work?

Abstract Fields is a personal interpretation of a range of landscapes including urban landscapes, seascapes or natural landscapes. Through painting I conceptualise my experience of landscape, abstracting it to represent its essence in colour and shape.

The paintings are not a response to specific landscapes but are more about interpreting and abstracting the landscape through memory or imagination. However there is no fixed interpretation to the work, rather I hope the viewer will interpret the work in their own way. Perhaps a work might remind them of their own experience of the beach for example.

There is evidence of making in the textual quality of paint, which has been applied loosely with complementary colours breaking through layers. The painting surface holds all the marks and gestures as traces of the painting process.

The work is intended to be optimistic and have a positive emotional affect, offering respite from the more challenging aspect of life.

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  • Where did your interest in painting begin?

 From about the age of 6 years old I decided that I wanted to be an artist. Later in primary school I was interested in Op Art. My interest in art continued into high school. At 20 years old I enrolled in the South Australian School of Art, majoring in painting. My graduate work included some very large abstract pieces based on my experience of a building and its surrounds I traveled past each day. After art school I went back to do a Graduate Diploma in Education to become a secondary art teacher. I worked as a secondary art teacher for twenty years. While teaching I found I didn’t have the time or motivation to paint or draw, until I enrolled part-time at Adelaide Central School of Art (ACSA). After a couple of years studying at night I decided to leave teaching and enrol full-time at ACSA. ACSA was significant in renewing my interest in painting. I particularly enjoyed Abstract Painting and being challenged conceptually. My graduate work at ACSA included a series of large abstract paintings, which were interpretations of my local landscape.

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  • You say you ‘conceptualise your experience of landscape through your painting works, abstracting it to represent its essence in colour and shape.’ Which landscapes have made a particular impression on you in your life? Why?

 My local landscape has made an impression on me over the years. I have spent a lot of time walking from home, along Fourth Creek up to Morialta Falls and back again. This repeated experience allowed me to notice things I wouldn’t necessarily notice before such as the yellow line on the side of the road, which demanded my attention. Other landscapes I have interest in are those, which I can repeatedly visit for example the foreshore of Semaphore, where my son lives with his family.

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  • Does painting the landscape in a literal fashion interest you?

I have painted the landscape literally in the past. My focus was still on interpreting the landscape by painting its atmospheric qualities. In the past I was particularly interested in cloudscapes for their emotive effect. At present I am more interested in interpreting the landscape abstractly, allowing it to act as a mnemonic.

  • How long have you been a practising artist?

 I graduated from ACSA in 2009. I’ve been practising as an artist for 9 years. My practice initially involved painting, drawing, photography and video. In 2011 – 2014 I completed a Master of Education (Research). At the moment I am enjoying the focus I have on abstract painting.

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  • What has influenced your artistic direction? Has there been any significant moments in your life, or major artistic influences?

 I find I am heavily influenced by my experience of day-to-day life. Significant influences have also been my study at ACSA, including abstract painting, my conceptual development and my research of abstract artist Richard Diebenkorn.

  • What are you working on next and what are you looking forward to?

 I am continuing to interpret my experience of the landscape through abstract painting. I am experimenting with works on paper using a range of media including watercolour, gouache, acrylic, gesso and collage. I am also looking forward to experimenting with drawing media for example charcoal and gesso.  Another interest I have is to incorporate abstracted sections of the built environment with the abstracted landscape.

Artist profile: Jane Skeer

ANEW by Jane Skeer is the first exhibition of 2018 at Gallery 1855 and is drawn from the need to rethink the ready-made.

Made entirely from recycled materials, Jane’s works are standalone visual feasts that allow the viewer to experience colour, texture and pattern in entirely new dimensions.

We chatted to Jane more about her work and what drives her to create art from the objects and materials no one wants anymore.



Why do you hold such a fascination for discarded objects and why did you decide to use them as the basis for your artwork in ANEW?

I see beauty in everything. I believe everything should be given a second chance, including us. I remember watching Disneyland every Sunday evening when I was a child, and the joy I’d feel when the fairy would light up the castle with her magic wand. That feeling has stayed with me as an adult. In a way I believe I’m doing just that today. Rejuvenating stuff and hoping it makes people smile the same way I did back then.

We live in such a throwaway society today. I decided halfway through art school to work with waste, believing I didn’t want to make any more. The joy for me is in the making, searching for new ways to re-present each material I find. I want my audience to be as fascinated with the material as I am. I aim for the viewers to look firstly at the design, but always looming in the background is the fact that we waste too much. I guess it’s educational in a playful way.

What were your intentions with the body of work in ANEW?

My intentions with this work are no different to any other work I have made. I invite the viewer into the gallery to ask questions and to think about the story I’m trying to convey. I enjoy the truckie slings for the life they have led, supporting a heavy load while absorbing a little bit of Australia on their travels. The colours, the stains and the frays describe their livelihood and in a similar way could describe ours. The title Retiring the load indicates its end, hanging up its boots, it’s earnt its rest, it may also imply something of the load we carry roaming on this planet. I’d like to think my work is highlighting, in an abstract way, what it is like to live and be in Australia.

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Image: Jane Skeer ‘Retiring the Load III’  (2018). Polyester.

How long have you been a practising artist?

I am an emerging contemporary artist who is heavily involved in South Australia’s arts community. I exhibit work regularly throughout South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia. Most recently I have been chosen to represent South Australia at BOAA – the Biennale of Australian Art, Ballarat, I am the 2018 SALA – Artist in Residence at the Royal Adelaide Hospital and in April I’ll be working in Mount Gambier activating the Sir Robert Helpmann Theatre.

In 2016, I was the recipient of the 2016 Arkaba Hotel Commission and the Adelaide Central School of Art, Fontanelle Residency. In 2017, I worked at the Adelaide Festival Centre as an Artist in Residence for both, the DreamBIG Festival and the SALA Festival, which was proudly supported by the Burnside City Council.  The work, Flyers, earnt the 2017 SALA Emerging Artist Award. In June 2017, I participated in a mentorship with the City of Tea Tree Gully – IGNITE public art incubator and have recently installed my first public art work in the main street of Port Pirie.

What has influenced your creative direction? Has there been any significant moments in your life, or major artistic influences?

I remember deciding in Year 11 at Tenison College in Mount Gambier that I was never going to make it in art. I handed up my end-of-year painting next to a boy who in my eyes, was the real deal. That was it – my art career was over before it had even begun. I didn’t look back until my kids grew up and didn’t need me anymore.

I decided to join art school at the age of 46 to do the odd painting class. I enrolled very casually but was soon hooked after reading an article on Rosalie Gascoigne and how she started her art career in her fifties. She gave me belief in myself, something I had lacked for most of my life.

The Adelaide Central School of Art is the most amazing place to study art. Their teaching staff and office staff are all my heroes and they would have to be high on my list of major influences. Without their guidance, nurturing and tough critique, I wouldn’t have made it this far.

Of Nature 17
Image: Jane Skeer ‘Of Nature (Whyalla) 17b  (2018). Discarded festival flyers, timber


What are you working on next and what are you looking forward to?

I am extremely excited to be opening a studio and gallery space Collective Haunt Incorporated in Norwood which will house 19 fellow artists. I am planning to work a lot more community-minded in the future, as I really want to give back. My calendar for 2018 is very heavily booked. which is absolutely scary but very exciting at the same time. I think I work better under pressure.

Jane also ran a workshop from 14-15 March, where participants used an assortment of old road signs and other discard materials to design and produce a large-scale artwork on the fence adjacent to Gallery 1855. 

Here are some stunning shots of the finished artwork ‘Sign of the Times’, and also some behind-the-scenes shots:

 


ANEW opened Sunday 25 February at Gallery 1855 and is on display from Wednesday 28 February until Thursday 29 March.

Artist profile: Sami Porter

Ceramic artist Sami Porter recently opened her first solo exhibition at Gallery 1855.

Entitled in Flux, Sami’s exhibition is about the sheer wonder and delight of microscopic forms, that have evolved into art works.

Sami has combined ceramics and natural-found objects into contemporary sculptural works, expressing a dialogue of interconnection, appreciation and imagination between our existence and that found in the hidden and microbiological aspects of nature.

She says ‘My rapture has become the alchemy of the crystalline glaze; It is a glaze that grows visible crystal structures under precise kiln conditions. I embrace it in my work to emphasise notions of organic process and growth; creating a tiny world of wonder all of its own.’



Your new exhibition, inFLUX, is described as a micro-voyeuristic journey of nature in process. Tell us more!

I am captivated with the micro-world, as it offers us the comprehension that life transpires all around us; often existing unnoticed. I incorporate natural found-objects into my contemporary sculpture works, to express a dialogue of interconnectedness, recognition and imagination between our existence and that found in the hidden and microbiological aspects of nature.

Lamenta Gaia I
Image: Sami Porter, Lamenta Gaia I (group of 5), 2017, thrown porcelain and crystalline glaze.

Why did you create these works?

After my Honours degree, I wanted to continue the research and work I had begun with microscopic and unnoticed entities. My inspiration and concepts were infinite!

What do you hope people see?

I hope the response to my work will be a personal journey of curiosity, and would attract anyone with an interest in contemporary ceramic sculpture, art, science, nature and the surreal.

I believe my practice offers an innovative context of organic hybridization and biological fantasy, delivered through sculptural works made from the Earth.

Higher Ground (detail)
Image: Sami Porter, Higher Ground, 2017, hand-built porcelain, crystalline glaze.

There is a variety of artwork in your show. Can you share a bit about how you made them?

As I am inspired by nature, my works often start with drawings and design. Most of the works in this exhibition are porcelain and are wheel-thrown, hand and slab built, and slip-cast.

My key passion and technique with ceramics has become the use of the crystalline glaze. This glaze grows visible crystal structures and I have been employing it to express notions of organic process and growth.

Wood-wurm (tall & small)
Image: Sami Porter, Woodworm, 2017, terracotta and metallic glaze.


Where does the need to make art come from for you?

Biophilia (the love of living things) has been the core motivation for my art practice. Making art is my homage to Earth, and fills my need to make interesting and beautiful objects.

What’s the next thing you’re working on?

After a short break, I will return to making porcelain with crystalline sculptures, looking at larger forms with a microscopic, botanical and fantastical influence.

I am always researching and concocting my new crystalline glaze recipes!


in FLUX is on display at Gallery 1855 from Wednesday 27 September until Saturday 28 October 2017.http://www.cttg.sa.gov.au/gallery1855

Artist profile: John Whitney

Bridges may be the most invisible form of public architecture.

Each day we cross bridges as we commute to work or school, visit family and friends, going about our daily lives. We take their presence for granted, never stopping to think how life would be different without them.

Gallery 1855’s current exhibition No Bridge Too Far depicts the architectural and engineering aspects of South Australian bridges, with works by Adelaide artists James Parker and John Whitney.

Using pen and ink, encaustic painting, digital imaging printmaking and installation, they explore the bridge as a landmark and anchor for identity of self and place.

James says “When I was young I assumed that if someone didn’t grow up right next to a bridge, then they longed to. I still believe that.”


 

John Whitney is a well-known and highly regarded visual artist who has been working with South Australian schools and communities over many years.

He started his working life as a secondary visual arts educator. After a number of years teaching he has dedicated his talent and skill to continuing his work with school students but as a professional visual artist.

John won the Education and Arts Ministers’ Award for his work as an artist working in schools in 2003, and has also won a number of Art awards and prizes over the years.

He has been a core artist working for Carclew’s Arts & Education Program in Artists in Schools, Arts Blast, Cargo and Creative Education Partnership Artist in Residence projects (AiR). John was one of two lead artists for Carclew’s AiR project in Murray Bridge in 2010, which went on to win an international award from The Campaign for Drawing (U.K.).

John’s work is not limited to schools, as he is also in high demand for Adelaide’s annual WOMAdelaide, Adelaide Fringe and Festival. He also contributes his time and skills to working with communities and Councils both in metro Adelaide and regionally.

We caught up with John to ask more questions about No Bridge Too Far:

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James Parker and John Whitney at the opening of ‘No Bridge Too Far’

 

Your joint exhibition at Gallery 1855, ‘No Bridge Too Far’ depicts the architectural and engineering aspects of South Australian bridges. How did this idea come about?

Through Carclew I was teamed up with James and we have worked on several successful drawing projects, Come Out activities and other workshops in schools for the last nine years.

Following my stroke in 2014, as part of rehab James suggested working towards an exhibition together on the topic “Bridges of South Australia”…… why bridges you can ask James more on that part!

So for the past two years, armed with sketchbooks and cameras we’ve traveled the state in James’ van discovering and capturing bridges.

Why bridges?

For me I like the physical presence of a bridge; its structure, the material it’s made of, as well as the practical nature of safely crossing something.  It is also a time capsule ……. often the remains of previous bridges stand beside the current ones, and locals have tales to tell of their bridge. I lived in Murray Bridge for four years and those bridges were certainly the main landmark.

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John Whitney, The Children’s Bridge, Strathalbyn
2016
30 x 20cm

 

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John Whitney, The Old Bridge Mitcham
Colour pencil on Fabriano paper 300gsm
2015
30 x 40cm.
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John Whitney, The old footbridge, Oakbank
2016, 20x30cm.

 

You have worked in several South Australian schools, as a teacher and as an artist-in-residence. How did you come to find your preferred visual arts medium?

Drawing has always been my main area of interest in the Visual Arts as it’s important not only in the arts but right across our lives.  It designs, explains and records much of our activities. It’s transportable and can have so many presentations from a scribble to photo realism.…… I’ve always drawn.

I trained as an Art Teacher and taught in country and city schools for eleven years. I then resigned but got invited back into schools as an artist. That was thirty years ago. Since then I have worked constantly in schools doing murals, hebel carving, drawing workshops, painted poles – all over the state.

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John Whitney, The culvert near Burra,
2016
30 x 20cm

 

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James Parker, Port Wakefield River,
2016
Encaustic on board

 

 

 

 

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James Parker, Bruce,
2016
Digital image

Where do you take inspiration from?

 

I get inspiration from the world around me …….  physical objects, landscapes, buildings and structures more than the human figure. I enjoy recording the detail of the world around us; I always have a sketchbook or journal handy as well as a camera. Themes and topics develop over time which often evolve to be an exhibition or a series of drawings.

 

No Bridge Too Far is on display from 10 May – 10 June 2017 at Gallery 1855.

 

Artist profile: Belinda Broughton & Ervin Janek

The Story Stones
29 March – 29 April 2017

The Story Stones explored the human desire for meaning and story by Adelaide artists Belinda Broughton and Ervin Janek.

meaning gathers —
around the hearth
eyes glitter

 

sparks rise
we doodle in sand

 

names
are mouthed
for the first time

‘fire, sand, meat, light
char, flame, shadow, word’

in chaos and randomness

we find image, we find story
and meaning gathers

as meaning
always gathers

 

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Ervin Janek and Belinda Broughton – partners in art & life

Through her career, Belinda Broughton has used materials that range from dirt to the finest art materials, producing work in a diversity of art forms: paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, collage, gallery installations, and installations in nature.

Thematically she has been engaged with the cycles of life/death/life and order/chaos/order, with a focus on natural and purposeful mark moving towards script and symbol, and, recently, moving towards image and story.

She has also spent the last decade focusing on poetry (with a decent publication record) and is interested in the interface between poetry and visual art.

We asked for more details about ‘The Story Stones’ and her work.

 

In the past you and Ervin ran a toy manufacturing company. Can you tell us more about this time in your life? Were you both practicing artists back then?

It was a good little business. It paid the mortgage; brought up the kids. We made educational jigsaw puzzles and games and, with valued employees, did everything in-house – from the ideas and artwork, through to screen printing the images and woodworking, to packaging and promotion. We were also bringing up three kids, so it was exceptionally busy. Even so, we managed a shared exhibition, and we were in a number of group shows. Ervin also held a number of solos during that time. It was great to have an income to support our art.

We downsized the business in 2001 and concentrated on art from then on. But we kept making a few of the more lucrative toy products until Ervin had a heart operation in 2006.

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Your exhibition at Gallery 1855, ‘The Story Stones’ features a range of work and mediums, including artist books, drawings, prints, photography, installation and sculpture. What draws you to so many art processes?

Easily Bored? I love learning new processes and playing with materials, but I was having a hate affair with painting for a few years prior to this show, and had been concentrating on illustration, partly looking for a new business opportunity to replace the toys.

I discovered I am eminently unsuitable for doing illustrations to briefs because I found it stressful and some little saboteur in my brain kept wanting to add inappropriate things, like gumboots to wedding attire, for example. So I allowed myself to go off on tangents and a lot of this work arises from that. It is completely different to the paintings I had been doing (non-representational, formalist field paintings), but I’m loving the figurative playfulness of them. And even feel that I’d like to move into painting again.

As for the books, I am a poet, and words play a huge part in my art and life. So between words and illustration, it is natural that I would get into books. I will explore books more, both published and artist books.

Ervin has always worked in photography, block printing, and sculpture. He is very inventive and playful, especially (in my opinion) in photography.

Free Bird
Belinda Broughton, Free Bird, 2016 
archival inkjet print, edition size 12
41 x 59cm

 

Vacant
Belinda Broughton, Vacant, 2016
archival inkjet print, edition size 12
42 x 52cm

 

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Ervin Janek
Stone Head, 2016
Stone and branch
54 x 25 x 12cm
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Ervin Janek
Untitled Figure, 2016
Archival inkjet print, 54 x 36cm

‘The Story Stones’ is about the exploration of the human desire for story and meaning. Can you expand on this?

Well, stories are just so important to human beings aren’t they? Historically they have been used in many ways, for example, the passing down of critical survivalist information, the delivery of news, as a type of subversion against political powers, as an aid to rites of passage, and they have been used, simply, to entertain. It has been posited that there are a very few types of stories, and yet these stories have been told in infinite ways across the world throughout human history.

Ervin tells a great story, a facility I plundered to write my book Sparrow, Poems of a Refugee, (his life stories in poems). As a writer I am fascinated by story, the concept, and by individual stories. Meet me and it won’t be long before I prise your life story from you.

Ervin’s work is very often about actual stories, but also can be a suggestion or a trace of story. My newer work is often allegorical also.

A few years ago Ervin produced an exhibition called Unfinished Allegories, photographs that suggest stories, but which he invited the viewer to ‘finish’. This began a dialogue between us about the nature of story and whether stories are ever really finished.

I have a rock sculpture on which I had inscribed the word ‘story’ over and over again. As I worked, the grease from my hand smudged some of the words, and I had to work over them again. It became a sort of palimpsest of itself. Called The Story Stone, it seemed a great metaphor for stories, how they fade and keep renewing themselves. Once Ervin and I appreciated the concept of story as a connection between our practices, we went with Story Stones as an exhibition title.

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Where do you take inspiration from?

Compost is quite fertile, isn’t it. Actually the cycle of life, death and renewal (or chaos-order-chaos) is one of my big themes, so compost is, in fact, quite inspirational. I love mark, accidental, natural and human. I love processes and seeing what a different process can offer. I am interested in myth and science, fibre and other crafts. I am appalled by politics. I am renewed and inspired by nature in general, and am appalled and frightened on it’s behalf too. I have very broad interests and do not separate my writing from my visual arts, so there are a lot of things at play that find themselves being expressed.

Ervin is interested in expressing his feelings, and is always exploring new ways of doing that. Also he keeps himself alert to what is happening around him, so he might, for instance, see a shape in a tree that he will photograph and team with other images in his composite photographs. Or, if he is working in wood or stone, he works with the materials to enhance what they have to offer. on occasion, from my position, Ervin’s connections seem arbitrary or unconsidered, and next thing he has expressed something so precisely with these very connections, that my jaw drops.

 

What’s the next thing you’re working on?

Oh, I don’t know. I think I need to have a post-exhibition crisis first! But seriously, it is too early to put rigorous demands on myself. One needs to find time to play. It invigorates whatever is coming next.

I don’t usually find out what I’m really doing until I am part way through. I have the desire to take some of my playful figurative images and see what gestural acrylic does to them. I have a collection of poetry coming out from Ginninderra Press towards the end of the year. I want to produce some artist books and I have a new blog to set up. Lots of plans, but I find that, since the exhibition, I have been drawn to writing poems, and have even written a couple that I like.

Ervin is working away on small stones. He calls them pain-killers, as the process keeps his immediate concerns at bay. We lost a son to brain cancer last year, so there is a fair amount of avoidance behaviour going on in our life. Craft helps.

He will continue to put two and two together in his photographs. at least that is how I know him; photography is a constant in his life. But his aim in the near future is to throw himself into woodblock printing again.

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Ervin and Belinda with Gallery 1855 director Niki Vouis, ARTAG members and local artists

References:

New website and blog: belindabroughton.com

old blog address (still active): belindabroughton.wordpress.com

Ervin’s website: ervinjanek.com

Hills Edge Clay

The Fringe Festival is around the corner and we are about to launch our bi-annual ceramics exhibition Hills Edge Clay. We’re presenting the work of 20 Adelaide based artists, including Lauren Abineri, Alison Arnold, Amelia Castellucci, Anna Couper, Jo Crawford, Nikki Dowdell, James Edwards, John Feguson, Helen Fuller, Philip Hart, Marie Littlewood, Sunshine March, Sophia Phillips, Sami Porter, Alison Smiles, Merrilyn Stock, Silvia Stansfield, Samone Turnbull, Mark Valenzuela and Angela Walford.

Tea Tree Gully has a certain affinity with clay – historically (in terms of porcelain clay mining) and creatively (in terms of the local community’s interest and engagement in ceramic art). Since Gallery 1855 opened, we have worked towards deepening this affinity by connecting South Australian ceramic artists with the community through Hills Edge Clay and other creative development activities.

Exhibition launch: Sunday 5 February 2017 | Opening speaker: Klaus Gutowski, ceramic artist | Exhibition continues until Saturday 18 March | Images: Alison Smiles, Koala Jars, 2016, South Ice porcelain, glaze, gas reduction fired; Sophia Philips, Seed and Wreath, 2016, porcelain, wire; Merrilyn Stock, Diving on coral, 2017, Celadon glazed, southern ice porcelain; Helen Fuller, Vide poche, 2016, Terracotta, slip, oxide; Marie Littlewood, Tri pods, 2016, raku clay, glaze.

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I heart paper & Ink works

Gallery 1855 is currently featuring two paper-based exhibitions by two Adelaide artists:

I heart paper by Ellen Schlobohm, is a ‘love letter’ from the artist to her chosen medium, reflecting on the true beauty of paper &  Ink works by Cathy Gray, a collection of intricate pen and ink patterns on paper.

Both exhibitions demonstrate an intuitive approach to design and to the materiality of paper, but in very different ways. Cathy has focused on abstract black and white pattern designs, while Ellen’s approach to her intricate paper cuts is more relaxed and conceptual.

Cathy Gray
Image: Cathy Gray, Balance (detail), 2013, pen & ink on paper, 75 x 75cm.

 

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Image: Ellen Schlobohm, Woven, 2016, hand-cut fabriano academia 200gsm, thread, approx. 23cm x 23cm.

More about the artists and their work:

Cathy Gray (in her own words)

My pen is my constant companion. It has enabled me to express myself freely over the various periods of my life.

So, with only pen and paper I begin with a dot. My work is rarely planned. I prefer to let each piece evolve and guide me. This approach gives me freedom from expectations. The majority of my work takes the form of a circle. For me the circle transcends time, cultural boundaries and evokes harmony and peace. It reflects wholeness and our interconnection to the world around us. In the beginning is the end and in the end is the beginning.

I draw exclusively in black and white. In all of the complexity of my art, restricting the colour palate to black and white brings with it certain stillness and simplicity. While a coloured palate enables you to glance at a picture and see the colours, black and white forces you to stop and look deeper into the piece; allowing you to see the story behind the art.

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Image: Cathy Gray, Unspoken Word, 2015, ink on paper, limited edition print, 700 x 700mm.

Ellen Schlobohm (in her own words)

‘I heart paper’ is a love letter from a paper artist to the medium in which I work. 
My skills have been tested as I’ve pushed the boundaries of practice to reveal the true beauty of paper. Several of my pieces include thread or other intricate 3D elements.

Other works acted as skill testers, challenging me to see just how small I can cut.
My work is created by meticulously cutting away paper by hand to leave behind delicate tableaus. I’m drawn to paper as a medium for its simplicity and strength. I also delight in watching this humble material come to life as I make each cut and the image is revealed.

I have expanded my arts practice to include other artistic avenues such as screen-printing, installation and mixed media works. This year I’ve taken part in several exhibitions and was a finalist in the Emma Hack Art Prize with my work The Eyes – a papercut photograph featuring my sister.

Ellen Schlobohm
Ellen Schlobohm, Flourish (detail), 2016, hand cut Fabiano academia 200gsm, screen-printed Fabiano academia 200 gsm, 50 x 50cm.

Cathy and Ellen’s work is on display at Gallery 1855 from now until Friday 24 December.

Artist profile: Margie Kenny

In the organic garden (ladybird) by Margie Kenny

Adelaide designer Margie Kenny’s illustrations at Gallery 1855 are vibrant, charming and yet thought provoking.

Her latest exhibition Connected explores the idea that all creatures and nature are connected and that life is an incredible force.

A childhood spent in the Adelaide Hills impressed on Margie a love for nature and a passion for conserving native habitats and species. Her illustrations aim to capture nature in a way that brings joy to viewers and an awareness of the role we all play in preserving the environment.


Tell us about your artistic background.

I always loved art and design in school, and went on to university to study a Bachelor of Education specialising in Design. I then worked as a graphic designer and illustrator in the areas of health and education, and began teaching design at UniSA. I have exhibited in several group exhibitions, and this is my first solo exhibition.

What is your current exhibition at Gallery 1855, Connected about?

Connected is about how nothing happens in isolation on our planet – all creatures and habitat have an effect on one another. Creatures are so closely connected to their habitat. It’s a celebration of the beauty of nature – from wildlife across the world to a ladybird in the backyard garden. The exhibition also highlights a connection we may not be so proud of – the rapid loss of habitat and wildlife through deforestation to feed our consumption of palm oil in processed food and household products.

In the organic garden (ladybird) by Margie Kenny
Image: Margie Kenny, In the organic garden (ladybird), 2016, hand drawn mixed media digital composite print on cotton rag paper, 52 x 52cm.

Why is the natural world so important to you?

My love of nature goes back to my early childhood growing up surrounded by scrub and native wildlife in the Adelaide Hills. The natural world supports the life of all creatures including humans, and without it we could not survive.

What concerns you about the world we live in?

There is an alarming rate of change in the natural world primarily at the hands of the human race, and I believe as individuals we can have a more positive influence on change. For example, there are critically endangered species losing their habitat and lives through rapid deforestation to make way for palm oil plantations – while we continue to consume palm oil which is hidden in a high percentage of supermarket products and processed food. It can go completely unnoticed to many of us, even to those who are nature lovers.

Gardener's companion, by Margie Kenny
Image: Margie Kenny, Gardener’s companion, 2016, hand drawn, digital composite print on cotton rag paper, 52 x 52cm.

Where and how do you make your works?

Several of my pieces are detailed and realistic in tone and form and are produced in my studio by hand, using graphite pencil or biro with my own photographs as reference when drawing (e.g. Turning tide, Nature’s fine line and Microclimate).

Some of my most recent pieces (e.g. Habitat and Uncertain future) begin with an idea that is drawn roughly on layout paper then progressed to a final accurate line drawing. These drawings are then scanned onto the computer, and hand drawn/painted colour textures are also scanned and cut to shape and combined with the line work in Photoshop software. The final illustrations are then printed at a high resolution onto cotton rag paper for a high quality finish.

Rhythm of life by Margie Kenny
Image: Margie Kenny, Rhythm of life, 2014, hand drawn, digital composite print on cotton rag paper, 51 x 51cm.

What you hope people take away from seeing these works?

I hope the work brings joy and inspiration to the audience, and perhaps a renewed awareness of the role we all play as consumers. Informative bookmarks are available to take home to enjoy and to help identify palm oil in products we buy.

Microclimate by Margie Kenny
Image: Margie Kenny, Microclimate, 2009, ball point pen on paper, 53 x 53cm.

What are you working on next?

I’d like to further explore the idea of habitat and endangered species, focusing on the concerns but also on the positive work being done in Australia and overseas on rescuing and reintroducing wildlife into habitats. In the process I will also be exploring illustrative styles for my own development as an illustrator.

Connected is a Gallery 1855 exhibition at 2 Haines Road in Tea Tree Gully, from 12 October until 12 November 2016. 

Artist profile: Catherine Hewitt

Paper and multimedia artist Catherine Hewitt recently exhibited her work in Remnant Formations at Gallery 1855 during SALA Festival 2016.

Hewitt’s interest in geology and love of nature walks prompted her latest work, part of her ongoing investigation into how landscape formations are interpreted by tourists, collectors or purveyors.

Both natural and manmade materials are used for clash and harmony in her works, to depict ancient landscape formations. Soft and yielding materials like seagrass and cotton rag are used as a foil against grittier elements like copper, steel and rust.



What or who has made a great impression on you?

I have always had a keen interest in art since I was a child – my father in particular encouraged me to paint- he bought me some paints and took me with him when he was out painting (painting for him was a hobby). Whilst studying graphic design in Tasmania I also took courses in photography and printmaking and enjoyed being able to combine these related mediums.  I’ve worked in freelance design and for a number of years had a stall at various markets in Tasmania.  I moved to South Australia at the end of 2004 with my two children.

The following year I started working at the Hahndorf Academy where I met Regine Schwarzer with whom I am currently exhibiting.  We both did the Masters by Coursework at UniSA at the same time and have exhibited together over the last few years.

Your current exhibition at Gallery 1855, Remnant Formations references mineral and rock formations. Is geology a personal area of interest of yours?

Yes! Actually, I would say that science in general is of interest to me – it often provides the grist for my mill!  I like to walk and when I do, sometimes I find things of interest and I like to find out what these things are – where they fit in the ecosystem, what role do they play.

For example the group of handmade paper lanterns in the exhibition titled of a gorgeous nothing are a result of finding a seagrass ball (then hundreds more!) on Goolwa beach.

Likewise the embossing titled Lithos is my interpretation of limestone rock formed from marine particles. Once while walking on North Keppel Island, I found a small disc with a hole in the centre – then I found many more and many years later I found out what they were – Foraminifera.

Lithos III
Image: Lithos III (edition of 5), Photopolymer emboss Fabriano 285 gsm 67 x 54 cm

 

I do like rocks and the whole geological interconnected process – how mountains are formed, the different types of rocks, the layering, the colours, the erosion that results in beaches.

A few months ago Regine and I both went on a hiking trip to the Flinders Ranges. I had never been there.  Walking through the various gorges and seeing all the striping in the rocks was wonderful. In fact, the oxides that I have used in some of the work come from there.

How did you begin this collection? Was there something in particular that triggered its development?

This collection of work is a continuation of previous work. I am really interested in how our landscape is formed and how we define and delineate that landscape.  I find maps and mapping very interesting.  Previously I had used digital photography to represent this and for this exhibition I wanted to leave the computer and return to something more hands-on.

You say the production processes mimics the natural, in terms of how you have interpreted minerals, rocks and sand in your work. Is this easier to do than it sounds?

It was not something that we set out to do, rather that it was something already happening within our processes.

In nature nothing is wasted, everything is used, transformed, merged; there is erosion, heat, and reforming of materials.  As artists we do the same, working with the materials of our choice. Metals are shaped by applied pressure, cutting and heat; stones are cut and shaped and placed with the metal; paper from plant matter is broken down and reformed.

 

What would you love to work on in the future, or who would you like to collaborate with?

I will continue with what I am doing at the moment knowing that one thing always leads to another, even if there is a break sometimes. I always enjoy working with Regine and love the way our work sits together.  Another artist I would like to collaborate is metal sculptor, Astra Parker.

Artist profile: Talia Dawson

Talia Dawson

Talia Dawson’s paintings are being shown at Gallery 1855 as part of the 2016 SALA Festival.

Colourful, cheery yet delicate, Talia’s works celebrate the native flora of South Australia. Flowers and plants are her endless inspiration. She regularly travels around her home state to see native species up close and record their features for new works. Talia is in her final year at the University of South Australia, as she works towards becoming an art teacher.

Talia’s paintings will be on display at Gallery 1855  until Saturday 24 September 2016.



What’s your artistic background? What or who has made a great impression on you?

My love of art; of painting, drawing and creating stems from my childhood, a passion inspired by my mother at a very young age. Over the years my mum has watched my artistic talents grow, constantly teaching and encouraging, allowing my abilities to bloom.

I am now pursuing an artistic career in teaching – a pathway that’s been seeding in my mind for years – currently completing my final year in a Bachelor of Visual Arts at UniSA.

Talia Dawson
‘Equally Beautiful’, Talia Dawson, 2016. Acrylic on canvas. 91cm x 60.5cm.

Your current exhibition at Gallery 1855 features several of your contemporary floral paintings. How did you begin this collection? Was there something in particular that triggered its development?

I’ve always been inspired by nature, influenced particularly by our beautiful South Australian landscape. So naturally, I was drawn to the flora our state has to offer, amazed and intrigued by the patterns, colours, workings and general organic abstractions of nature. There are so many hidden gems, the individual details of the landscape often more intriguing than the land as a whole. Exploring this beautiful state that I call home, I have gathered a compilation of fascinating photographs; photos that greatly influence my final creations.

What do you hope people take away when they see your work?

Through my work I aim to encourage others to observe the often overlooked, to be puzzled and captivated by nature’s abstractions, and to discover for themselves the beauty hidden within the South Australian landscape. I wish for people to look through my eyes, to see the ordinary in an unusual way, and to appreciate these obscurities like never before.

Purple and pink features strongly in your paintings, why is that?
The colour theme just seemed to happen naturally. I guess I want to bring happiness and joy to people’s lives, and the bright pinks and purples allowed me to do this, while also tying my body of work together as a whole.

What have been some of your career highlights?
I’ve exhibited in a couple of exhibitions prior to the current Gallery 1855 exhibition, however I consider my career to be only just starting! At the conclusion of Year 12 I was involved in the SACE Art Show. That was probably when the addiction first started, the hunger to continue painting and creating, to further exhibit my artworks for others to see and appreciate.

What would you love to work on in the future?
The future daunts me. I think it’s something I will just have to wait for and see what happens. I believe I will however always centre my practice around nature, immersing myself in the ‘art world’ of SA and beyond and bringing beauty to all that appreciate my work.


 

Artist profile: Jason Cordero

Gallery 1855 is celebrating the work of six South Australian artists with five distinct and dynamic exhibitions.

Two of these exhibitions feature paintings by Jason Cordero and Talia Dawson.

Among all these works, there seems to be a common theme, or curiosity in nature, and exploring that curiosity, whether real or imagined.

Jason has kindly agreed to be profiled. His gigantic sky landscape paintings are bold and spectacular – including his 3m-long painting, Bridge of Shadows.  Self-taught and painting from his imagination, they invite the viewer to imagine the story behind the image.

We hope you can see Jason’s spectacular paintings at Gallery 1855, on display from now until Saturday 24 September.


 

 Jason Cordero 

Can you start by providing an introduction about yourself and your professional background? What or who has made a great impression on you?

I am an Australian painter who lives and works in Adelaide and studied at the South Australian School of Art. I don’t really consider any one person a particular influence, but have just looked to my innate love of the natural world. I essentially taught myself how to paint; I haven’t ever had any “this is how you paint” lessons. University was about thought; technique was not considered. I do, though, have a love of 19th century history painting – I have an interest in people like Waterhouse, Alma-Tadema, Leighton. I also have particular interest in ancient history and architecture. These influences are more obvious in my most recent work.

Currently on exhibition at Gallery 1855 are several of your landscapes. Can you tell us more about these paintings? Are you referencing a particular place?

These works have been developing over a few years and were first shown together at BMG Art in an exhibition titled The Mountain. I was interested in the idea of wilderness and the sublime; not place as such but the narratives and sensations places can generate.

The sky is a major feature in your landscapes. A lot of your focus is on the expanse of sky, the light, the shadows and its dominance over all other elements. Is this intentional?

The sky is indeed the major feature. I’ve always been fascinated by the atmosphere and its emotive power. Just from a physical point of view it fascinates as it provides such an amazing display simply from the diffraction and diffusion of light through colourless gasses and liquid. I do intentionally draw attention to the sky and its dominance (certainly as far as scale goes) over the other features of the landscape; after all a mountain top can be an inviting place one moment and deadly the next depending on the movement of the air. Of course, all is intertwined as mountains often create the conditions for dramatic atmospheric phenomena. For example, just this past week has seen here in Adelaide some beautiful orogenic clouds along the hill face – at Tea Tree Gully we had a prolonged heavy down pour with the sun streaming in from the cloudless west. Very beautiful.

Everyone is talking about your colossal painting, The Bridge of Shadows. It looks like a glacial dreamscape. Does it all come from your head? Or is it a combination of places you’ve seen and then reimagined?

The Bridge of Shadows is in form entirely imaginary. It started as gestures in a little sketch with the sweep of the clouds and the impossible peak. Though not a real place, it is none the less playing with memories and experiences of my travels in Australia; just expanded and developed to create something else. Like most of the work from this series, it suggests a narrative, that something is about to happen – what, I can’t say.

Jason Cordero
Jason Cordero, The Bridge of Shadows (detail), oil on linen, 122 x 305cm.

What have been some of your career highlights?

My highlights, I suppose, were the winning of some prizes – the John Leslie Art Prize being the most significant. I also enjoyed the opportunity of having a solo exhibition at the Gippsland Art Gallery – indeed, Bridge of Shadows had its first outing there. It’s been reworked in the meantime though. Of course, I mustn’t forget this year’s three-month Redgate Residency in Beijing; that was an extraordinary experience and I do intend to go back.

What would you love to work on in the future, or is there anyone you would like to collaborate with?

As for the future, I’ve started to incorporate figures and the built environment in my work. My most recent exhibition presented work very different to any I’ve done before. I also want to start producing some sculpture. On a different tack, I’d love to collaborate with the State Opera of South Australia in stage design and there has been some movement in that direction. In the same vein, I’m also exploring the possibility of stage design with the State Theatre – I think it would be a fascinating collaboration.

Gallery 1855 is open from Wednesday to Saturday, from 12-5pm and is located at 2 Haines Road, Tea Tree Gully. 

Artist Profile: Niki Sperou

Gallery 1855 is celebrating the 2016 Adelaide Fringe Festival this year with bioartist Niki Sperou, who is exhibiting her work in the show Matrix: the body as scaffold for the methodologies and metaphors of science.

It’s the first time Niki has displayed her work at Gallery 1855 and the first time we have featured a bioartist. By definition, Bioart  incorporates living organisms or their parts.

Since 2006 Niki has been the resident artist at the department of Medical Biotechnology, Flinders University in South Australia. She draws upon observations from her academic environment, her Greek heritage and art training to conceptualise and complete her artworks.

Her work in Matrix is colourful, unpredictable and most of all thought-provoking… there is a skeleton constructed entirely from Borax crystals, lab-grown bacteria placed in a Petri dish and a neon-coloured quilt depicting works by Australian and international bio artists, a well-known bioscience experiment and more.

All of Niki’s works look at the three-way juncture of art, science and culture, and the common threads. It’s a show that Gallery 1855 habitues will love and one that is bound to entice newcomers.

We caught up with Niki just prior to the exhibition launch on Sunday February 7, to discover more.

Tell us about Matrix – what is your exhibition about? Can you expand on bioart and what it entails?

The term Matrix comes from the Latin and translates to womb or mould; it suggests the facilitation of becoming. I chose Matrix as the title of my exhibition as it speaks to the intersection of art, science and culture. My interest is in the body transformed via recent technological innovations and as such transverses some cultural boundary or norm. Allusion is toward an augmented body, one that achieves some new potential. This is reflected in artworks which have undergone some form of transformation in their production.

Bioart incorporates living organisms or their parts. The biological realm is subject to change.

Including several sub genres Bioart encompasses; genetic art concerned with the coding of life; interventionist art which creates disturbance toward multinational corporations and their products; ecological art and the impact of the anthropocene; art which examines the future potential of biological innovations and the resulting physical, ethical and cultural impacts; the do-it-yourselfers or hackers who enjoy the freedom to utilise materials for applications other than they were designed for.

Gallery1855.1
Image: Niki Sperou, Matrix (detail), 2015, pipe cleaners, crystallised salts, dimensions variable.
The morgue
Image: Niki Sperou, Matrix (detail), 2015, pipe cleaners, crystallised salts, dimensions variable.

 

Why the interest in the field of science? Do you have a background in the field?

I have been the artist in residence at the Department of Medical Biotechnology, Flinders University since 2006. My work satisfies a curiosity toward the nature of living things as well as the language, ethics and culture of science. Art and science have much in common, they are mutually dependent on experimentation and research.

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Image: Niki Sperou, Trust, 2016, glass Petri dish, agar media, E coli bacteria, antibiotic, paper, dimensions variable. Photo: Sam Sperou


What type of artworks do you create and what about this visual medium appeals to you?

The nature of biology is mutable; this provides inspiration. Further to this, much art is to do with mimesis, working with living things creates a new form of realism. For many years I have worked with living organisms or their parts; blood, bacteria, plants, plant tissue culture. These are usually augmented with scientific media; gel growth media, hormones, antibiotics etc. However traditional art media; drawing, sculpture, textile, photography and items from the domestic are also materials with which I communicate.

I will reference some works in this exhibition; The Ode to Bioart (memory quilt) is a tongue in cheek nod to the seminal works of Bioartists I have met or written about. These images include rabbits, flowers, frogs, pigs and other forms you might see on a domestic quilt, however a second look reveals things more intriguing. It is an attempt to bring the complexities science into the domestic realm.

Trust is a work I created for Toxicity, the first major Bioart exhibition in Canada. By recreating a common experiment for the testing of antibacterials, referred to as ‘Zones of Inhibition’, outside of the laboratory and within a cultural context, the long term effects of imprudent antibiotic use becomes a subject for debate. Highlighted is a need for mindfulness as well as consideration toward the common good with regard to capitalist goods. Within both science and culture power struggles occur as bodies are subjugated and territories are colonised.

Included are photographs of white carnations infused with human blood from my Chimera series. This series is one of my seminal works and speaks to the interconnectedness of living things. At the time of its production there was much hype associated with the mapping of the gene code. We now know that the genetic difference between all living things is quite small. To some this extends to the notion of a collective consciousness.

Matrix, is a skeleton composed of a scaffold of pipe cleaners upon which Borax (a common cleaning product) crystals have been grown. The work is inspired by a lecture series I attended at an AusBiotech convention. The focus of the lectures was a desire to move away from the modernist industrial model of high heat and metal for the production of structures. Instead the soft power of low heat and organic growth was preferred. The structure of bones, a combination of flexible protein and rigid minerals was a suggested model. Since then I have witnessed a trend toward various models of biopolymer matrices to mediate the body.

What do you hope people take away from seeing your works?

I want to bring science into the everyday, to make it accessible and to subject it to critique or contemplation.

Website-image
Image: Niki Sperou, Ode to Bioart, 2016, cotton on wool, 150 x 150cm.

I hold a Bachelor of Visual Art and applied Design (Drawing), AC Arts Adelaide and Honours First Class (Sculpture), University of South Australia. In addition to this I have an Advanced Diploma in Dress Design and Garment construction. I have tutored in Art theory at UniSA and have conducted BioArt workshops since 2006 in Australia, Europe and Canada. Art and science has been the focus of articles I have written for publication. I have exhibited with and attended conferences and workshops with renown bio artists.

Can you tell us a bit about your art background, your education, previous exhibitions?   What inspires you and your work?

Inspiration often comes from my cultural background; emergent are chimerical works which link Greek culture and biotechnology; fixed classical ideals clash against the fluidity of future potentials.

Dream project?  Dream exhibition?  Dream venue?

To work in collaboration with talented and inspirational artists and scientists toward a touring international bioart exposition.

Matrix officially opens at 2pm on Sunday 7 February at Gallery 1855, 2 Haines Road Tea Tree Gully. All are welcome.

Niki will also deliver a talk at the Gallery explaining Bioart and her exhibition from 1:30pm, Friday 4 March (allow approximately 1.5 hours). If you are interested, please register here

Matrix exhibition will be held at Gallery 1855 from 10 February until 19 March 2016. Opening hours are Wednesday to Saturday, noon – 5pm.

Artist Profile: Angela Walford

Artist Angela Walford is well-known throughout the South Australian art world for her beautiful homemade ceramic pieces. Many will know her from the monthly Stirling Markets, where her gorgeous stall and big smile greet hundreds of customers coming to pore over her ceramic and pottery wares.

Angela is a regular exhibitor with Adelaide art galleries, including The Urban Cow Studio, ‘The Terrace’ in Eastwood, Murray Bridge Regional Gallery, our very own Gallery 1855, and until recently she was based at the Tea Tree Studio in Golden Grove.

This year Angela was appointed a tenant at Adelaide’s JamFactory, which supports the careers of talented South Australian artists, craftspeople and designers. Angela is currently working from the JamFactory’s Seppeltsfield base in the Barossa Valley.

We caught up with her to congratulate her and ask her a bit more about the new gig.

Congratulations on your selection as the Jam Factory’s ceramics resident at the Seppetsfield Barossa site! Can you tell us how this came about?

Cheers. I was invited by The City’s Jam Factory Ceramics Creative director Damon Moon to consider the studio and a possible move to the Barossa and after seeing the studio, it was a fairly quick but considered yes!

Now that you’re based in the Barossa Valley, what opportunities and advantages do you have for the work you do?

I think the Seppeltsfield setting presents a very unique opportunity. The space is rather large and I look forward to establishing my workspace and running many workshops here, including Raku, handmade and surface decoration.

Ang Walford
Shino bowls – by Angela Walford

What are your Seppetsfield digs like? Describe the views you have!

My space is part of the original barn, it is a heritage space and I even have an old horse tying bracket on the wall outside (whatever that thing is called!!). The space has very high ceilings and exposed beam work, complete with rustic cracks and stained walls!

What kind of ceramic works do you like to create?

My work is varied and is quite often led by the seasons. One of my faves is an oriental glaze called Shino, which I use to make stoneware fired tableware, teapots and all kinds of food presentation wares. I make decorative wall tiles and mid-fired slip decorated wares from our local terracotta clay. In the summer I make a series of white wares – ‘lil birdie’ is a favourite – and more coloured,  brightly glazed and underglazed functional wares.

Shino bowl
Shino bowl – by Angela Walford
teaset-shino
Teaset – Shino – by Angela Walford

 

Shino bowl glaze overlay
Shino bowl glaze overlay by Angela Walford

How long have you been a practising ceramic artist? What initially drew you into this type of artwork and what keeps you going?

I was drawn to ceramics in my very first year of uni and spent all of my free time in the ceramics studio – so much so that my lecturer invited me to switch streams (I was studying Fine Art at the time).

I did switch to Design but went to the Graphics studio with a future business in mind. I returned to ceramic studies at the North Adelaide School of Art, which moved to Light Square and finished my studies there. I don’t think I will ever tire of clay, its plastic nature provides a huge array of possibilities, along with the alchemy fascination.

I think there will never be enough time to make what I want to make!

You say you are inspired by the seasons. How does this affect your works in winter vs. your works in summer? Autumn vs spring?

Yes certainly. Because a lot of my work is food driven, in winter I’m drawn to make all kinds of baking and serving wares according to what you might want to cook – say curries and soup in rustic shino bowls or tagines for slow cooking.

tagine
Tagine nouveau by Angela Walford

What are you currently working on?

I just completed a round of stoneware Shino noodle bowls and dip bowls and this week I am starting on the White series and getting back into the summer range.. And as always I’m working on a few things at once!

dip-bowl-celedon-and-chun
Dip bowl celedun and chun by Angela Walford

Can you tell us something people don’t know about working with ceramics or something a bit surprising about it?

I think that clay has the imposed character of the maker, I look at the handmade wares on my kitchen shelves and I can tell you something about the personality of the maker. The handmade object brings so much more than functionality to the daily experience. It brings warmth and humanity to breakfast or dinner, it bring stories of friendships and connection. I think that is the thing with handmade, with the slow food movement too, we are realising the importance of place and ecology and how we all connect.

the-new-breed-shino
The new breed Shino – by Angela Walford

What’s the best thing about doing what you do and what would be your dream project/creation?

Well, of course I think I have the best job in the world and am so happy that I can do it and that I love what I do. I can get my day’s work done and have chats and a cuppa with my studio pals! Nothing better than watching other people make either!

Ooh dream project – more collaborations around the very things I love, handmade in clay, food and celebrating with friends and family… even something on a larger scale… I’ve just sent off work to The Cup Collaboration in Melbourne and am very much looking forward to seeing the show. Such a great idea by my friend Adriana Christianson to bring people together across the globe to make the cup in partnership – the vessel that we all enjoy.

Related Links – Check out Angela’s work at the Cup Collaboration this October:

adrianachristianson.com.au/page/the-cup-collaboration

www.facebook.com/The-Cup-Collaboration-968685596526166/timeline/

Links to Angela’s websites and Facebook page:

angdesign.com.au

angelawalfordceramics.com.au

facebook.com/angwalfordceramics

Jam Factory at Seppeltsfield

SALA exhibition opening 9th August 2015

Gallery 1855’s SALA 2015 exhibition opened on a gorgeous Sunday afternoon and welcomed many participating artists and members of our local community and further afield.

A variety of works based on the theme ‘Looking but Seeing….something familiar for the first time‘ will be on display until Saturday 19 September.

Looking but Seeing: SALA 2015

DSC_0032 enhanced    DSC_0043

Local artist profile: Susan Long

One of Gallery 1855’s featured artists in this year’s SALA 2015 exhibition, Susan Long, says her featured work, Evening Glow’, was initially a work she had cast to the side in her studio, without a second thought.

But seeing an artist scraping through layers of paint during a visit Gallery 1855 created a desire to return to her work.

‘It was a complete surprise because it was a work I had finished and thought I was done with, but not long afterwards I saw an artist scraping through layers on a painting at Gallery 1855 and I knew I had to go home straight away and start working on it again,’ Susan says.

‘I had to get going and working on it very quickly, as the hands and mind must work together when inspiration strikes. I tend to work in layers and bright colours and when I started to scrape through the painting, it started to reveal itself to me.

‘But I’ve also learned to stop, wait and step back from a painting and read it and see what it’s saying. Paintings do have their own mind!’

Susan’s work, titled ‘Evening Glow’, depicts a sole tree in the middle of an undefined landscape, allowing the viewer to imagine where it could be.

‘To me it is a Tree of Life…and it could be anywhere, it could be on a farm, by water, it doesn’t matter. This tree is very grounding and by painting it, it has helped me to ground myself in the landscape and identify with landscapes I have been in.’

SLong_Evening Glow v2.0
Image: Susan Long, Evening Glow, Acrylic, 2015.

‘Often when I start a painting I have no idea where it is going to go.  I have to get into the rhythm of painting and then allow the creative process to take over.

Describing herself as a ‘colourist’, Susan approaches her work with a bold and colourful brush technique.

‘Vibrant tones always feature in my work, especially orange, which is my favourite colour and you will always see it somewhere in my works.’

Susan is a regular exhibitor at Gallery 1855 and local resident of the area. She has held careers in cooking, teaching and now focuses full-time on her work as an artist and freelance food writer.

Her work is included in Gallery 1855’s SALA exhibition, titled ‘Looking but seeing…something familiar for the first time’, which opens Sunday 9 August. Other featured Adelaide artists include Jane Greet, Amy Herrmann, Judith Rolevink, Greg Geraghty and Talia Dawson.

‘I think it’s a great time to be an artist in Adelaide, with the support of councils and their involvement in the SALA Festival.’

During the 2015 SALA Festival, Susan’s work will also be on display at the Pepper Street Arts Centre, The Red House Member’s Group Exhibition and  is part of a pop-up artist open day on Walkerville Terrace on Friday 28 August.

Looking but Seeing’…something familiar for the first time’  runs from Wednesday 12 August until Saturday 19 September.

Gallery 1855 is located at 2 Haines Road, Tea Tree Gully, and is open Wednesday – Saturday from 12-5pm.

For more information visit the Gallery 1855 website or phone 8397 7333.

See the full list of venues and exhibitions in this year’s SALA Festival.

‘Looking but Seeing’ ~ SALA 2015 exhibition at Gallery 1855

Looking but seeing features 25 South Australian artists using various media to respond to the experience of seeing something familiar for the first time.

There is no other festival like the South Australian Living Artists Festival (SALA) in Australia or the rest of the world. SALA embraces professional and aspiring artists at all levels and interests, while helping to grow the broader public’s awareness and curiosity in visual art.

During the month of August this state-wide festival encourages South Australians to go and visit (in addition to galleries) a whole lot of different venues (hospitals, restaurants cafes) to see visual art.

At Gallery 1855 we provide a platform from which our community can engage with the visual arts and we think this approach connects well with SALA’s ethos of inclusivity.

We’ve all experienced a difference or momentary strangeness in a familiar environment, object or person. These experiences can be unsettling but they can arouse one’s curiosity and call for deeper interpretations.

Looking but seeing proposes the importance of looking deeply, visually excavating and actually seeing or attempting to understand through the process of making art.

Opens: Sunday 9 August, 2pm
Where: Gallery 1855, 2 Haines Road, Tea Tree Gully

Exhibition dates: 12 August – 19 September

Artists:
Bente Andermahr, Gary Campbell, Annette Dawson, Talia Dawson, Ed Douglas, Greg Geraghty, Robert Habel, Amy Herrman, Margie Kenny, Cat Lennard, Susan Long, Sally March, Bridgette Minuzzo, Megan O’Hara, Ken Orchard, Christine Pyman, Amalia Ranisau, Judith Rolevink, Betty Smart, Chris Thiel, Di Vanstone

Amy Herrmann
Image: Amy Herrmann, untitled, 2015, Giclee print on photo rag, 100 x 75cm
Greg Geraghty
Image: Greg Geraghty, Hide & Seek 2014, Hiding. Oil on plywood 84 x 100.
Ed Douglas, Gateway of the manifold secrets: for David Nash, Archival pigment print, 76 x 100
Ed Douglas, Gateway of the manifold secrets: for David Nash, Archival pigment print, 76 x 100

Read more about the history of the SALA Festival in this article from The Conversation, where Gallery 1855 and Tea Tree Gully have been featured.

SALA

Get Inked

A provocative exhibition opens Sunday 5 July at Gallery 1855. Inked focuses on a series of prints and plates about inking paper and skin. We caught up for a chat about the exhibition with Curator Simone Tippett, who provides some fascinating insights below.

Inked, Lorelei Medcalf, etching
Inked, Lorelei Medcalf, etching

Tell us about the Inked exhibition coming up at Gallery 1855. What kind of artworks will be on display? Who has created these artworks and why?

Inked is an exhibition of prints and plates about inking paper and skin. The works are by contemporary Adelaide artists responding to the nexus between printmaking and tattooing in popular culture. Many of the works are on paper and are exhibited alongside the plates and matrices used to make the prints.

Printmakers circle through interesting sub-cultures that include street art, graffiti, zines, comics and roller derby. Many printmakers have an appreciation and interest in different forms of tattooing, piercing and scarification (and not just of skin) as these processes are akin to those of printmaking. We are all fascinated with ink and surfaces, regardless of whether we own tattoos or not.

Inked has been curated by Simone Tippett from Union St Printmakers and Vicki Reynolds, head of Printmaking at the Adelaide College for the Arts.

Do you consider tattoos to be a serious form of art?

Yes.

Generally speaking, I believe all forms of art are serious if that is what the artist intends. The subject matter or the manner of making artworks may be irreverent or un-serious, however, the search for meaning and the practice of making always is.

Also, there is no doubt that tattoos, like all forms of art, involve varying degrees of artistry and skill. I suspect that discussions about tattoos and art are similar to the wrangles that have been had for decades over ideas of ‘craft’ and ‘art’.

Having said that, I think most people would admit that the aesthetics and reasons for tattoos – the choices people make regarding their own skins – are incredibly personal. What is beautiful or meaningful to one person may be incomprehensible to another. In that sense, the ideas and expressions of tattoos have a real synchronicity with ideas of ‘fine art’ or ‘high art’. Ask 10 people visiting Gallery 1855 for their definition of art and you’ll get 10 different answers, a lot of criticism and possibly a heated discussion. Ask 10 people what makes a good tattoo or whether tattoos are serious art, and you’ll also get 10 different answers… But I wouldn’t criticise their choice of tattoo though!

Inked, Michael James Rowlands, Derby, relief print
Inked, Michael James Rowlands, Derby, relief print

A tattoo is normally a personal and intimate thing an individual has chosen for themselves. How can they be presented in a way for a broader audience, to evoke different reactions and insights?

Of all the questions I put to our group of artists, this one led to the most diverse range of answers. Some believe that tattoos are fundamentally intimate, verging on secretive. Others believe that an image displayed on their skin, within public view, is for public consumption within our contemporary image-saturated world. I hope that, in presenting this exhibition, we engender discussion about this.

Have you ever thought about staging a living and breathing tattoo exhibition, featuring real humans?

No.

There are plenty of expos and reality television shows that attempt this. There are also some interesting ethical, cultural and anthropological issues that would need to be negotiated in fully exploring this, beyond the usual conversations that are had on reality television. The Wellcome Collection in the UK is an interesting introduction to this: www.wellcomecollection.org/search/tattoo.

For example, in addition to some very accessible and interesting contemporary collections of skin, designs and tattoos, the Welcome Collection has a number of tattooed human skins that they are reluctant to exhibit for cultural reasons. A really interesting article about whether tattoos and skin belong in galleries can be found here: www.newstatesman.com/art-and-design/2013/04/will-tattoo-ever-hang-louvre.

An alternative view, of course, is that life is a living breathing tattoo exhibition. If you went to the Garden of Unearthly Delights during the latest Fringe Festival, you may have seen the Lizard Man. Go to roller derby or the AFL and you’ll see some great ink. Not to mention the experience of people watching at your local supermarket…

As one of the tattooed artists in this exhibition said, “We are all artworks in a way, aren’t we?? Living, breathing, travelling exhibitions…

Can you provide a short background on your printmaking and art career, and what you love about this art form?

I’m fascinated with printmaking, different processes, inks and surfaces. I love the idea of people who have never been interested in art, or who have had limited exposure to art, getting interested in exhibitions and learning to do something completely new. My aim is to plant seeds that get people away from their computers and into environments where they can play, have serious fun and make things with their hands. Printmaking is such a good way to do that.

I teach art at a community level with Union St Printmakers in Stepney. My co-curator, Vicki Reynolds, is the head of Printmaking at AC Arts. We are both on the Print Council of Australia and both regularly organise exhibitions that include printmaking. I am relatively new to the Adelaide printmaking scene, whilst Vicki has been a practicing artist and teacher for all of her career.

The artists in this exhibition hail from a diverse range of backgrounds. Come to the exhibition, see their works and find out more…

Inked, Simone Tippett, resingrave engraving - Heart III
Inked, Simone Tippett, resingrave engraving – Heart III

What do you hope people get out of seeing the ‘Inked’ exhibition at Gallery 1855?

I hope that Inked pulls people unused to fine art galleries into Gallery 1855. I hope it starts a conversation about what art is, what a gallery is and what belongs in a gallery – both in terms of public spaces, as in Gallery 1855 and also with respect to alternative spaces, as on people’s skins and in the private spaces in which they live. Looking at art and collecting it is an intensely intimate experience – whether in a fine art gallery, on your body, or via the images that you hang at home and live with. I feel that art is a conversation and a way of life, as much as the sports team you support or the clothes you wear. It is a way of interacting with and communicating with the world.

The thing that has amazed me, so far, in organising this exhibition is the diversity of responses from the artists. Not everyone has tattoos, others are covered with them. Most like and appreciate tattoos, but not all. Some are more interested in the cultural history and significance of tattoos, and what this says about us. Most of the artists are printmakers, in that they make prints, but many name themselves otherwise, for example as painters, drawers and graphic artists. However, all call themselves artists first and foremost, and all are serious about their art, even if their subject matter is irreverent, satirical or comical.

This is not an exhibition about tattoos per say – there are plenty of documentaries and expos that deal with the various contemporary sub-cultures of tattooing. Rather, this exhibition is about the idea of ink to a group of artists who are united in their fascination for ink on different surfaces.

Inked is on display at Gallery 1855 until Saturday 1 August. Gallery 1855 is open from Wednesday to Saturday, noon-5pm.

Eclectic Avenue – an exhibition featuring works by Ian Willding

Opens 2pm Sunday 24 May at Gallery 1855, 2 Haines Road Tea Tree Gully SA

Exhibition dates: 27 May – 27 June 2015

Ian Willding has had many careers – chef, house painter and special needs teacher. However it is painting that truly excites him and is his lifelong passion. Ever since his childhood, Ian has turned to art to express thoughts and feelings on his Wiradjuri heritage and family, and recurring dreams he has experienced throughout his life.

Ian Willding
Ian Willding with some of the works from ‘Eclectic Avenue’

Growing up in Forbes NSW, Ian was allowed to roam the countryside with friends, with his eyes taking in the vastness of the land and its ever-changing colours, which would later dramatically emerge in his art works. A weekly afternoon art class during high school years was where Ian’s great interest in art began, with the support of a dedicated teacher and the vibrant energy of a class made up of students from many cultural backgrounds.

After Ian finished school, art was put to the side when he moved to Sydney, gained his chef apprenticeship and stayed there working for over 20 years. He remained open to the art world in the 1970s and 1980s, constantly visiting galleries but he had a major realisation when he first came to Adelaide during the high summer in 1985.

‘I fell in love with Adelaide straight away. I sensed it was a city filled with art and I saw a lot of art during that time. I moved there in 1989 and slowly moved back into art.’

After joining the Redhouse Group in Marion, Ian started to intensely create art and held several exhibitions. A highlight for him was the Petroglyfs exhibition held at Tandanya, Australia’s oldest Aboriginal-owned and managed multi-arts centre.

‘The whole gallery was in darkness, waiting for the opening when these three women came down on silks and started mingling with the works and the crowd. It was spooky…I still get hairs on the back of my neck thinking about it.’

The clash of European and aboriginal culture is a key theme in Ian’s paintings, particularly the desecration of sacred sites and the introduction of foreign pathogens into indigenous tribes. Ian’s works also focus on the evolution and the future of the aboriginal race and how its people are starting to ‘revolt and push back’ against the destruction of their native culture across Australia.

Ian Willding, Seconds In, acrylic on canvas, 76 x 153cm, 2014 - 2015. 774KB. Web size
Ian Willding, Seconds In, acrylic on canvas, 76 x 153cm, 2014 – 2015

Eclectic Avenue is a survey collection of Ian’s art produced since 2009, during his time at Adelaide’s Central Studios. Many of the works in this exhibition are also based on the colours and vivid imagery from poetry. Indian writer and painter Rabindranath Tagore, the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, is described by Ian as ‘a major and significant influence’.

Since 1996, Ian has exhibited works every year and has curated many exhibitions across Australia. He hopes visitors to Eclectic Avenue will gain an appreciation of the spirit of his aboriginal heritage over the course of his artistic journey and how crucial it is that this culture is not lost.

For more information about Ian Willding visit www.iankwillding.blogspot.com

All artworks featured in Eclectic Avenue are available to purchase. Please ask a Gallery 1855 attendant for assistance.

Step by Step – Illustrations, prints and other works by Sally Heinrich 1 April – 9 May

Illustrations and prints by Adelaide artist/illustrator Sally Heinrich will be displayed in the Step by Step exhibition  from 1 April to 9 May at Gallery 1855.

The exhibition will be launched on Friday 10 April, 6pm.

This exhibition showcases many of Sally’s illustrations from the children’s picture book, ‘One Step at a Time’, which is based on the true story of a baby elephant that had to get a prosthetic hip after stepping on a landmine on the Thai Burma border.

Jungle Sunset
Image: Sally Heinrich, In the evening, hand-coloured lino print, 2014, illustration from ‘One Step at a Time’, written by Jane Jolly, MidnightSun Publishing, 2015.

Sally exhibits linoprints, giclee prints and hand-drawn illustrations using water colour, lead pencil, pen ink and technical pens. She has been drawing for over 30 years as a professional artist.

Misty mornings and golden sunsets
Image: Sally Heinrich, Misty mornings and golden sunsets, 2014, hand coloured lino-print, 22x22cm. Image courtesy of the artist. Illustration from One Step at a Time, written by Jane Jolly and published by Midnight Sun Publishing, 2015.

Many of Heinrich’s works have previously been exhibited throughout Asia and Australia. She has illustrated more than 20 books, in addition to writing and illustrating her own picture books. Her work has been recognised by the Asialink Foundation, The May Gibbs Children’s Literature Trust, Varuna-the Writer’s Centre and Arts SA.

Having previously lived in Darwin, Sydney, Singapore and Malaysia, Sally is currently based in Adelaide. She studied illustration at the University of South Australia.

On Saturday 2 May, Sally will host an illustration workshop for beginners at Gallery 1855. Anyone with an interest in illustration is welcome. The cost is $25 per person.

We hope you have a chance to see this stunning exhibition this autumn.

‘Cos we are living in a Material World

Collagraphs created using ink and recycled materials have been on display in the foyer of Tea Tree Gully Library throughout the 2015 Fringe Festival. They were made by participants at the Material World workshops held at Gallery 1855 in late 2014.

The workshops were facilitated by printmaker Simone Tippett, who showed participants how to create the layered print works through using recycled materials. A collagraph is a type of printmaking technique that has a basis in collage.

simone-tippett
Simone Tippett

Recycled materials used to create these artworks included old onion and orange bags, plastic cafe blinds, paper doilies, pieces of string, feathers, leaves and bits of old paper.

The intention behind the workshops was to get participants to create collagraph works to provoke broader thought on how to use waste differently, and to encourage people to be more creative by repurposing things normally thrown away.

Below are several of the fabulous collagraph prints created during the workshops.

Union St Printmakers - Material World 01 LR   Union St Printmakers - Material World 03 LR (Alicia Renjata)  Union St Printmakers - Material World 04 LR (Pauline Miller)

Union St Printmakers - Material World 06 LR (Alison Main) Union St Printmakers - Material World 07 LR (Jan Finlayson)
All works are for sale $110, including the frame. Email us at arts@cttg.sa.gov.au if you would like more information.

If you are a resident in the Tea Tree Gully region, visit http://www.cttg.sa.gov.au/waste for more information about waste disposal options available to your household.

Gallery 1855 artist to take up art residency in Vietnam.

South Australian artist and Gallery 1855 favourite Annabelle Collett is heading to Vietnam to take up a three-month art residency at the New Space Arts Foundation in Hue City.

Annabelle Collett
Artist Annabelle Collett

Annabelle was awarded the residency by the pro-Asia engagement firm Asialink, and it will be funded by state government arts funding body ArtsSA. During her time in Vietnam Annabelle will explore site-specific items in developing sculptural works that look deeper into attitudes, sexuality and identities.

Annabelle Collett has worked as a professional artist, designer and craftsperson for over 30 years. Her constant explorations have engaged her in a variety of disciplines, applications and collaborations.

She is known for her sculptural elements, which primarily use fabric, as well as plastics, mosaic, metal, fibres and found objects. She explores the abstract coverings of both the body and the environment we live in, conveying them as resonators of social history, gender attitude and personal commentary.

Annabelle Collett
Artist Annabelle Collett installing her ‘Material World’ exhibition in Pine Park Reserve (behind Gallery 1855) in November 2014.

In 2013 she facilitated the Fantastication creative development workshop series for the local community at Gallery 1855, helping participants create a large-scale wall installation made from plastic waste at the Golden Grove Arts Centre.

Recently she facilitated Material World, another workshop series where the creative outcomes were exhibited in the form of a large-scale installation in Tea Tree Gully’s Pine Park Reserve. For this community arts project, participants used fabric waste to create new objects and were encouraged by Annabelle to rethink about the things we throw away.

We send our congratulations to Annabelle.

Contested Landscapes coming up soon at Gallery 1855

Contested Landscapes: natural and built environments undergoing change. Works by Robert Habel.

Opening 2pm, Sunday 21 September.

Robert Habel, Palmer Landscape 3, 2011, oil on canvas, 140 x 127cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
Robert Habel, Palmer Landscape 3, 2011, oil on canvas, 140 x 127cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

About the artist:

Visual artist Robert Habel has been painting landscapes for over thirty years but not in the traditional sense.

His practice doesn’t acquiesce to the traditions, rules and nostalgic affirmations of the past.

Instead, his landscapes deal with issues of ecological and cultural sustainability.

To Robert, the depiction of land undergoing change or suffering abuse is as relevant in art today as idealistic landscape painting was in the past.

For more information about Robert’s creative practice please visit his website

Come along to Robert’s floor talk on Saturday 25 October from 2pm.

Want to know more about what we are doing in the Gallery and Studio? Visit our website